Art by Skyecrystal Teacher, Writer, and all-round geek when it comes to all things museum-y.

I work as a teacher, facilitator, instructor, and educator at the ROM. I am also the main tweeter/blogger for the @ROMHandsOn Galleries

You can find me on twitter @MuseumGirlSarah

(Art by Skyecrystal)
thebrainscoop:

The rainbow scarab, (Phanaeus vindex). These dung beetles are found throughout the United States and are indicators of high-quality ecosystems because they are typically only found in those which are healthy.
All dung beetles play a significant role in their environments as natural sanitation crews; utilizing the refuse of others for subsistence not only cleans up the landscape but also reduces the number of pests and flies attracted to such. Rainbow scarabs apparently prefer swine and opossum dung heavily over that of raccoon and - yuck - horses…. but human dung is their favorite. Mmm. 
More~

thebrainscoop:

The rainbow scarab, (Phanaeus vindex). These dung beetles are found throughout the United States and are indicators of high-quality ecosystems because they are typically only found in those which are healthy.

All dung beetles play a significant role in their environments as natural sanitation crews; utilizing the refuse of others for subsistence not only cleans up the landscape but also reduces the number of pests and flies attracted to such. Rainbow scarabs apparently prefer swine and opossum dung heavily over that of raccoon and - yuck - horses…. but human dung is their favorite. Mmm. 

More~

Janet Stephens, Independent Scholarship, and Roman Hairstyles

medievalpoc:

obfuscobble:

medievalpoc:

overlordrae replied to your post: eruditefag asked:I’m just wonderi…

Asking about how qualified someone is in academia always brings to mind how a hairdresser discovered how Roman hairstyles were done when many thought the portrait styles were just idealized fancy.

Janet Stephens, tearing down ur Ivory Tower:

Stephens, a hairdresser based in Baltimore, took a trip to the Walters Art Museum back in 2001 and learned about the intricate hairdos worn by Vestal Virgins so she could duplicate them herself. But she ended up delving further into the fashion and art history books than she’d anticipated. Four years later, Stephens made a phenomenal discovery that she says “essentially changed the field of classical hair studies.”

While reading Roman literature, she stumbled across the term “acus” which has been translated to “hairpin.” But Stephens’ experience with embroidery sparked the theory that these ancient hairdos were actually created using a needle and thread — which was pretty convincing. Her findings were published in the 2008 edition of the Journal of Roman Archaeology.

"That quote everyone was referencing for centuries, but no one took it literally until I came along," she said. “Maybe that was the naivety in me.”

When she’s not cutting, coloring and highlighting at Studio 921 Salon and Day Spa in Baltimore, Stephens is practicing what she preaches by recreating ancient Roman hairstyles at home. Her YouTube channel includes tutorials featuring background on the women who wore these intricate hairdos, insight on their hair textures, the types of styling tools used and how they’d maintain these looks.

But of course HOW DARE SHE QUESTION THE “ACCEPTED FACTS”, RIGHT?

:D

Y’all help I can’t stop watching these ancient roman hairstyling vids.

1. dang they had crazy hair ok?
2. SEW THAT HAIR
3. Who thought up these hairstyles like seriously it was some sort of party where they tried to build houses with hair or something
4. Someone thought this hairstyle up.  Now Janet Stephens recreates it.  At the end of the vid she even shows how to do those weird curl crowns that look like headbands but nope it’s hair.

SERiously!!!! I think people are underestimating just HOW COOL THIS IS:

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THERE ARE SIMPLE ONES, TOO!

Classical Greek Hairstyle:

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^ I would even do that!

dendroica:

Black death was not spread by rat fleas, say researchers

The Black Death arrived in Britain from central Asia in the autumn of 1348 and by late spring the following year it had killed six out of every 10 people in London. Such a rate of destruction would kill five million now. By extracting the DNA of the disease bacterium, Yersinia pestis, from the largest teeth in some of the skulls retrieved from the square, the scientists were able to compare the strain of bubonic plague preserved there with that which was recently responsible for killing 60 people in Madagascar. To their surprise, the 14th-century strain, the cause of the most lethal catastrophe in recorded history, was no more virulent than today’s disease. The DNA codes were an almost perfect match.
According to scientists working at Public Health England in Porton Down, for any plague to spread at such a pace it must have got into the lungs of victims who were malnourished and then been spread by coughs and sneezes. It was therefore a pneumonic plague rather than a bubonic plague. Infection was spread human to human, rather than by rat fleas that bit a sick person and then bit another victim. “As an explanation [rat fleas] for the Black Death in its own right, it simply isn’t good enough. It cannot spread fast enough from one household to the next to cause the huge number of cases that we saw during the Black Death epidemics,” said Dr Tim Brooks from Porton Down, who will put his theory in a Channel 4 documentary, Secret History: The Return of the Black Death, next Sunday.
To support his argument, Brooks has looked at what happened in Suffolk in 1906 when plague killed a family and then spread to a neighbour who had come to help. The culprit was pneumonic plague, which had settled in the lungs of the victims and was spread through infected breath.
The skeletons at Charterhouse Square reveal that the population of London was also in generally poor health when the disease struck. Crossrail’s archaeology contractor, Don Walker, and Jelena Bekvalacs of the Museum of London found evidence of rickets, anaemia, bad teeth and childhood malnutrition.

(via The Observer)

dendroica:

Black death was not spread by rat fleas, say researchers

The Black Death arrived in Britain from central Asia in the autumn of 1348 and by late spring the following year it had killed six out of every 10 people in London. Such a rate of destruction would kill five million now. By extracting the DNA of the disease bacterium, Yersinia pestis, from the largest teeth in some of the skulls retrieved from the square, the scientists were able to compare the strain of bubonic plague preserved there with that which was recently responsible for killing 60 people in Madagascar. To their surprise, the 14th-century strain, the cause of the most lethal catastrophe in recorded history, was no more virulent than today’s disease. The DNA codes were an almost perfect match.

According to scientists working at Public Health England in Porton Down, for any plague to spread at such a pace it must have got into the lungs of victims who were malnourished and then been spread by coughs and sneezes. It was therefore a pneumonic plague rather than a bubonic plague. Infection was spread human to human, rather than by rat fleas that bit a sick person and then bit another victim. “As an explanation [rat fleas] for the Black Death in its own right, it simply isn’t good enough. It cannot spread fast enough from one household to the next to cause the huge number of cases that we saw during the Black Death epidemics,” said Dr Tim Brooks from Porton Down, who will put his theory in a Channel 4 documentary, Secret History: The Return of the Black Death, next Sunday.

To support his argument, Brooks has looked at what happened in Suffolk in 1906 when plague killed a family and then spread to a neighbour who had come to help. The culprit was pneumonic plague, which had settled in the lungs of the victims and was spread through infected breath.

The skeletons at Charterhouse Square reveal that the population of London was also in generally poor health when the disease struck. Crossrail’s archaeology contractor, Don Walker, and Jelena Bekvalacs of the Museum of London found evidence of rickets, anaemia, bad teeth and childhood malnutrition.

(via The Observer)

For “#GetCreative” day on Museum Week, I decided to introduce people to our caiman skin in The Patrick and Barbara Keenan Family Gallery of Hands-on Biodiversity, which is not only one of the coolest specimens we have, but also features one of the most innovative storage solutions. 

This was also one of my favourite vids to make. It was incredibly fast — done on a fifteen-minute break, with vocals provided by a friend in Nevada on Thursday night. It was just one of those things that demonstrates how neat living in the Internet age can be.

romkids:

Lamassu on the Move!
This custom built Lamassu piece, built for our just finished Mesopotamia Exhibit, is moving. Unlike the rest of the artifacts and sets which are travelling back to their museums ‘round the world, this ancient god will find a permanent home somewhere else in the ROM. Watch for it to reappear later this Winter!


Found it! Check out the new Mesopotamia-style nursing station in the CIBC Discovery Gallery!

romkids:

Lamassu on the Move!

This custom built Lamassu piece, built for our just finished Mesopotamia Exhibit, is moving. Unlike the rest of the artifacts and sets which are travelling back to their museums ‘round the world, this ancient god will find a permanent home somewhere else in the ROM. Watch for it to reappear later this Winter!

Found it! Check out the new Mesopotamia-style nursing station in the CIBC Discovery Gallery!

Some cool behind-the-scenes and “did you notice” stuff I’m photographing to tweet for Museum Week’s “Behind the Art” day.

From the new Mesopotamian-themed nursing station in the Discovery Gallery (we had to do something with that amazing lamassu after the Mesopotamia Exhibition closed), to the often-missed animals made from contrasting types of stone in the Rotunda floor, to the fossils in the walls around the totem poles, to the Hands-on Biodiversity touchable teaching collections, to the hidden remains of the old Budongo Rainforest diorama behind a wall, there are a million things to see that most people overlook or can’t see. This is why I love ehmeegee​ and thebrainscoop​ so much — she GETS it.

The public displays are just the tip of the iceberg.